Making Money on Poshmark 101

I'm become increasingly addicted to Poshmark in the past few months and wanted to share a few of my tips for getting started and making $$$. 

For years I dabbled on and off of this app and didn't commit to it as it is a ton of work. Fair warning: the app is aggressive and overwhelming. They send you daily affirmations, 3 parties per day, constant retweets from people trying to push their goods on you, and you have to leave on notifications to see if something is selling. 

But if you know how to start it off right, you'll start to get a rush off the sales. I've been selling an item almost every other day for the past month now that I've got momentum, sometimes I get two in a day. There's no better feeling once you get that SOLD notification late at night or first thing in the morning. This money funds any shopping I do so I can get my ideal wardrobe. And the cycle repeats. 

I do Poshmark (my closet is here) because it works and I get the most money back. When I get excited about Poshmark a lot of people ask about Thread Up and say isn't it easier to send in items? Please. You get $2-$6 per item and I'm personally offended to sell my collection and newer pieces for a ridiculously low price. It is easier but its purpose is getting clothing out of your closet not making money.

Also there's Buffalo Exchange / Crossroads/ Plato's. This was how I sold clothes growing up and now I am ridiculously grateful for apps to sell clothes because these options are the worst. First everyone always feels a weird sting of rejection as they never take much. Then their buyers are dispassionate about clothes and are never dressed well so they don't know taste when they see it. I stopped going after them rejecting bags of on-trend clothing while they carry racks of 10 Gap shirts. Excuse me but why does 80% of your store look like trash and you're rejecting mine? 

For consignment stores in the area, I'll dabble but I make generally $6-$18 per item after they take the 50% cut, but if I sell it on my own I generally make 1.5 - 2x more. So I only go to consignment stores after something isn't selling or I feel they can sell it faster. I get paid monthly via a check, whereas Poshmark is once the buyer accepts which is a week max. Once you get good at Poshmark I find I make the money I'd make at a consignment store in a few days or a week vs what I'd make there in a month. 

Also if you really don't have the time or are too lazy, I'm happy to help sell it for you - contact me in the "Selling" tab :)

Now that I've unloaded, here's what I recommend with Poshmark:

1. Master the lighting and create a good backdrop for your clothing

The main thing you'll learn in the app is to take beautiful photos with good natural lighting. It's not necessary to sell pieces, but it does speed up the process and make your store look legit. I had a cute backdrop in the beginning, but the lighting wasn't great so I now find I'm getting more traction with a nicer setup. A plain white wall or a rug on the floor work well. Here's an example of my before and after:

Ok lighting and cute alcove but could be a bit more crisp. I did sell pieces like this though!

Ok lighting and cute alcove but could be a bit more crisp. I did sell pieces like this though!

Not the best lighting but people will buy if they're looking for the piece. 

Not the best lighting but people will buy if they're looking for the piece. 

After: Much better lighting plus use of mannequin (I've had it but I had to rearrange my room to get a better backdrop). I'm moving into styling the pieces to amp it up.

After: Much better lighting plus use of mannequin (I've had it but I had to rearrange my room to get a better backdrop). I'm moving into styling the pieces to amp it up.

2. Fill in descriptions

For the title of the item I use a catchy title that focuses on the trend of the dress - "Southwestern Mami Maxi Dress" and I add emojis if it feels appropriate to spice things up. Then you fill in the other areas - type of clothing, size, quantity, etc. Make sure you list the right brand esp if you have petite or tall clothes! When it comes to the Brand I play games here because I've realized the customers on Poshmark (or society in general) are from a culture of brand zombies crazy about getting brands for the cheap.

I find myself calling things "Free People" or "Brandy Melville" constantly because if I do a random brand or vintage it doesn't get exposed enough to get traction since people follow their favorite brands and see the latest uploads. In the example above I doubt "O'Neill" as brand will sell this dress, unless I'm mistaken in people's loyalty to that brand. They do send auto warnings if you change the brand constantly but I have yet to see any crackdowns. I generally caveat in the description that the piece is "marked Free People for exposure" and say where I got the piece. 

I also include how something fits - especially if it's marked and M and fits as a small, etc. People will often ask for measurements but I do these once I get a request. Next level would be doing it all at once to make sales quicker.

3. Find online merchandise photos if possible and/or celebs wearing the clothing

After I do a photoshoot of all my items and upload them with descriptions, I search Google to get photos of celebs in a similar piece or the photo from a store's website. This isn't a necessary step but it helps, generally I do this later in the night while watching TV or while waiting in line at Trader Joe's. 

I love Hailey and her outfit here and it gives the vibe of what this skirt would look like

I love Hailey and her outfit here and it gives the vibe of what this skirt would look like

Here's the actual skirt I'm selling for $55 because it's Theory and I want to lose weight to fit into it... but will sell if someone's buyin'

Here's the actual skirt I'm selling for $55 because it's Theory and I want to lose weight to fit into it... but will sell if someone's buyin'

This definitely gets people's attention more and inspires them to get the look. Sometimes when I'm really inspired I do photos of the vibe like these Marie Antoinette-esque shoes I found at an estate sale:

Search as a few crucial details if you don't know the specific name of the item (ex: J Crew Silk Blue Tank) and search the Photos tab and it generally comes up within the first scroll of the page, but sometimes I dig for the photo. 

4. Pricing

Go $5-$20 higher with your piece just in case you have a hit and then you can accept lower offers. Sometimes you post a piece right away and get 10 likes, so best to keep the price a tad higher so you don't undersell and it goes too soon (see my Equipment top above that was too cheap). People are nonsensical on these apps when it comes to pricing. They're deal mongers trying to WIN the best prices not lovers of fashion. They really won't buy until they feel like they get a deal even if a dress was $120 and you sell it for $30!

I had a new Susana Monaco dress never worn that didn't look right on me and listed it for $40 - for context it was originally $100 and sold out on sale at $70 which I included a screenshot of. I received many offers low balling for $15 or $20 but sold finally for $25 to someone who appreciated it. This is a HUGE DEAL but I suspect many fashion lovers aren't using Poshmark enough. It's a tradeoff between selling quickly for cheap or holding out for a higher price. Sometimes the right buyer comes at the right time and really wants a piece so pricing doesn't matter, but sometimes you discount to help it sell. 

5. Get annoying in the parties. Or don't. 

The jury is out on this one whether the parties help or not. I find interested buyers find you, not the other way around but I get a boost in followers from doing parties. The way parties work is you share your clothes to them if they fit a certain theme. Some of the options are "Best in Shoes," "Vacation Ready," and "Anthropologie, Free People, Urban Outfitters Party." 

There's 3-4 parties per day so the notifications can get annoying but it's an opportunity to sell. Once I share my pieces to the party I'm welcomed by many fake retweets from other sellers and a like once in a while that gets my hopes up. I may have gotten one direct sale from participating in a party every day for the past month, so you can skip this step if it's too chaotic. I do think the next level for me is liking and engaging more people in the parties to grow my network, but it's not going to be a source of directly selling.

6. Shamelessly friend people and like their stuff

This step I do casually when I see a piece I like in a brand's new arrivals of a brand or a party. I friend a ton of people and try to like one piece from their collection (only if I genuinely like it) to get them to look at my stuff.

Don't be shy out there

Don't be shy out there

There really isn't a lot of reciprocity here but I think any Posher would say to do it anyway. I notice people who have huge followings (10-15K) do follow a ton of people. I would recommend to spend more time on this than doing parties after I've reflected on this whole process.

Overall, once you set up and take a couple hours to list everything you'll start seeing that $$$ roll in! It's organized chaos but it works for now. Let me know if you're curious about anything else below!

xx